Areas of Work

Inclusion of Local Perspectives

QUNO seeks to be a bridge between civil society actors in the field and the UN and member states in New York and advocates for the inclusion of  such perspectives in peacebuilding processes. By facilitating visits of civil society and non-governmental organisations engaged in local peacebuilding and prevention activities, as well as through quiet diplomacy, QUNO is working to improve the inclusion of local perspectives at the UN.

Ongoing Activities

  • QUNO hosts informal, off the record discussions on the situation in Burundi and conducts quiet diplomacy with the UN in order to support civil society participation and perspectives in peacebuilding processes including the UN Peacebuilding Commission.

  • QUNO plays a facilitative role bringing civil society leaders from inside Myanmar together with UN staff and diplomats. These informal meetings provide an opportunity for Myanmar peacemaker’s to share local expertise and perspectives on the UN’s role and contribution to long-term peacebuilding and prevention efforts in Myanmar.

  • QUNO's focus on the DRC includes facilitating regular off the record discussions at Quaker House for members of the NGO community in New York and UN experts.

  • We advocate for the inclusion of local perspectives in UN processes on the ground and at UN headquarters

Recent Timeline Events

May 2018

Navigating Inclusion in Peace Processes

Following the launch of the joint World Bank and United Nations Report, Pathways for Peace, in March, the High-Level Event on Peacebuilding and Sustaining Peace in April and the launch of the Global Study of Youth Peace and Security, inclusion has been brought back to the forefront. On 14 May, the Civil Society-UN Prevention Platform (the Platform) found it timely to host one of its core-group partners, Conciliation Resources, in New York to launch their ACCORD publication, Navigating Inclusion in Peace Transitions. The publication, which resulted from four years of research, explores how inclusion is negotiated in countries in transition from war to peace, the common barriers to and trade-offs between inclusion and stability and the types of external and internal support that have been possible and effective in peace processes.

Hosted at Quaker House, this off-the-record conversation provided an opportunity for civil society actors in New York to hear the experiences of colleagues from Colombia and Nepal and discuss more concretely what inclusion looks like the in the various contexts. The research highlights that if inclusion is not talked about in the initial stages of a transition, it tends to be sidelined throughout the process if not totally disregarded. The research also highlights the fact that political transitions are points for renegotiation because transitions and political unsettlement create opportunities for change. However, when aiming for political stability is the focus for a country in transition, it can also be challenging to introduce inclusion policies. Often, the prioritization of stability can lead to a return of the old guard and continued exclusion of marginalized groups.  

The research also reflected on the strategies used by different groups, in particular marginalized groups such as women, to influence these processes of political transition. The report draws on practical experience that Conciliation Resources and its partners have learnt from working on these challenges.

The Platform was pleased to host this discussion and looks forward to continuing to convene meetings between civil society, UN actors and Member States to enhance the UN and civil society organizations’ collective capacity to carry out preventive work. 

Related Areas of Work

April 2018

New York Peacebuilding Group holds timely and impactful civil society meetings in sidelines of UN peacebuilding event

The United Nations (UN) Secretariat held a much-anticipated High-Level Event on Peacebuilding and Sustaining Peace from 24-26 April. This event, convened by the President of the General Assembly (PGA), provided a forum for Member States and the UN system to assess efforts undertaken so far and the opportunities that are available to strengthen the UN’s peacebuilding work. The HLE and the many side events surrounding the meeting provided a space for civil society organizations (CSO) working on peace issues to engage with the UN and Member State stakeholders. To support the building of relationships and partnership opportunities, and to support strategic discussion on peacebuilding and sustaining peace, the New York Peacebuilding Group (NYPG), facilitated by the Quaker UN Office, held two CSO-focused meetings throughout the week. 

NYPG began the week by hosting an informal breakfast at Quaker House to provide a space for CSO colleagues from New York and visiting globally to connect with one another ahead of the HLE. This informal platform allowed for participants to meet and mingle with fellow peacebuilding practitioners, and supported the building and strengthening of partnerships amongst this diverse peacebuilding community. Following the HLE, NYPG held a reflection and strategy lunch discussion, which provided an avenue for CSO colleagues to share observations and analysis from their experiences throughout the week. Conversation focused on expectations and next steps for peacebuilding and sustaining peace, the linkages with other peace agendas such as the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, and the importance of the inclusion of women and youth, and of national ownership for peacebuilding. 

By convening these two meetings at Quaker House, NYPG was able to provide space for colleagues to openly exchange and reflect on the HLE and side events, and the next steps for peacebuilding at the UN. QUNO looks forward to continuing to facilitate NYPG and to working with the group’s members to continue to provide avenues for strategic engagement across the global CSO peacebuilding community.
 

Related Areas of Work

March 2018

Meeting the Challenge of Peacebuilding and Sustaining Peace Through Partnerships and Inclusivity

The dual resolutions on peacebuilding and sustaining peace adopted in April 2016 by the United Nations (UN) Security Council and General Assembly (S/RES/2282; A/RES/70/262) marked a fundamental shift in the UN’s understanding of peacebuilding. Before peacebuilding was understood as taking place after conflict. However, by declaring sustaining peace as “a goal and process…aimed at preventing the outbreak, escalation, continuation and recurrence of conflict,” Member States now universally recognize that efforts to build peace must be taking place before, during and after conflict. 

Starting in 2017, the Quaker United Nations Office (QUNO) and The Global Partnership for the Prevention of Armed Conflict (GPPAC) undertook a dynamic research project to increase the practical understanding of what sustaining peace means; assess the progress and remaining challenges facing peacebuilding practice; and articulate recommendations for the way forward. The research led to a joint report, Building Sustainable Peace: How inclusivity, partnerships and a reinforced UN Peacebuilding Architecture will support delivery

To share their findings, on 9 March QUNO and GPPAC organized an informal conversation amongst Member States and UN colleagues to reflect on how inclusivity is and can be fostered, and how partnerships for building peace are practically developed and sustained. The event, titled Meeting the Challenge of Peacebuilding and Sustaining Peace Through Partnerships and Inclusivity, focused the challenges that hinder peacebuilding on the ground and at the regional and international levels. The meeting also provided an opportunity for peer to peer learning amongst participants as they shared examples of inclusive programming and reflected on challenges that have or continue to occur when seeking to develop and implement inclusive, partnership-based peacebuilding policies. 

Related Files

Related Areas of Work